The Comedy of Errors

The Comedy of Errors

Moorpark College 2018
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The Comedy of Errors The Comedy of Errors The Comedy of Errors The Comedy of Errors The Comedy of Errors doors The Comedy of Errors door The Comedy of Errors door
The Comedy of Errors door The Comedy of Errors door The Comedy of Errors door The Comedy of Errors door The Comedy of Errors door The Comedy of Errors set The Comedy of Errors set rendering

Five years ago, with our production of Henry IV Part One and Two, we decided that our Theatre department was going to do a Shakespeare show every other Spring semester.  At the time it was decided that instead of designing sets that were show-specific, I would design a traditionally influenced Shakespearean stage, that we would use for each Shakespeare production, and it would be augmented for each individual show.  The basic Shakespearean set concept is based off of aspects of the Globe Theatre and traditional two-story Shakespearean thrust stages.  It incorporates elements of those, while hopefully being a unique stage as well.  The idea is to mimic the traditional Shakespearean style, which was done on a designed stage, and not the recreation of a specific setting – also keeping it minimal with relation to scenery, furniture, and props.  For The Comedy of Errors specifically we decided to turn tradition on its head a bit and do something out of period – timeless, in fact – that had roots in history, but also tapped into cirque style, had a touch of steampunk, little bits of magic, and incorporate modern reference.  As a design, I chose to at least start somewhere in specific, so the base of the design was rooted in the historical context of the city of Ephesus where the show takes place, which is a Grecian city starting to be influenced by Turkish culture – this can be seen in the combination of the architectural style, along with the touches of colors, fabrics, and set dressing.  There was also a lot of reference regarding Ephesus at the time as being seen as a place of “dark magic” and “mystery” so little touches were added in support of this, to hopefully help the characters feel that “otherworldly” element.  Then on top of all that, we a had a working (albeit crew-powered), gear-driven clock, modern referenced doors, and hanging signs – amongst other little elements – all to help move things along, and help create hopefully what was an over-the-top world, augmented with all manner of little specific detailing.